How Summersalt uses data to modify swimwear

Or most consumers in the United States, now is not the time to consider swimsuits. In addition to some sunny sun pockets, the weather has become colder – meaning shoppers are more likely to consider wearing sweaters, hats and socks instead of looking for the best swimsuit.

But for the Summersalt team based in St. Louis, each season is a swimwear season, because that’s the expertise of e-commerce startups that are directly consumer-oriented. Specifically, this one-year-old startup offers eco-friendly swimwear for shoppers, in a commentator’s words, “Non-Coachella adults want to actually wear a suit instead of a one-time dress for a photo.

Summersalt is far from alone in the D2C swimwear collection. Andie, Bikyni and Onia offer direct-to-consumer choices designed to eliminate the pain of swimwear shopping with a simpler, more accessible digital experience. Everyone has their own unique style: Andie is all women’s design and made in the USA, Bikyni focuses on two-piece swimsuits, and the swimsuits made by Onia also serve as men’s daytime casual wear.

The idea for Summersalt co-founders Lori Coulter and Reshma Chattaram Chamberlin to join the business is that they can offer women something different from the typical “over-progressive” approach to swimwear.

“We want a brand to attract women like us, so we can feel sexy as we want. We want to attract women from all over the country, whether it is a Missouri mother or a Brooklyn fashion girl,” Kurt is interviewed. Said.

To build this attraction, Summersalt decided to focus on health, collecting all the data they could accumulate, and providing the right data for all types of customers. The company uses approximately 10,000 real female body scans and approximately 1.5 million measurements to design all swimwear. The company also has patents that recommend clothing based on body size and consumer preferences.

According to the founders, the goal is to provide as much brand as possible. Today, inclusiveness is limited by the size range because it only offers clothing sizes of 14. But this is a problem that the brand has decided to solve because it announced that it has announced the end of the $6 million Series A financing led by Peter. Thiel’s founder fund. Through the new fund, Summersalt plans to expand its products to 22.

“The core value of the brand is indeed inclusive. We know from an economic perspective that by upgrading to the 22nd, we can really get a wider range of consumers,” Kurt pointed out.

But how to make them is just one of the salient features of the Summersalt suite. The second major difference is the materials used to make them. All bikini tops and bottoms, as well as single pieces, are made from recycled textiles and packaged in reusable bags.

“Our fabrics are five times more powerful than recycled textiles,” says Chamberlin. “Our materials come from cutting-edge steel mills with the same philosophy around the world. We are not perfect in terms of sustainability, but we are working hard every day to improve our practices.”

Improvements – and with the latest funding injections, are also expanding. In addition to expanding the scale, Coulter and Chamberlin also pointed out that they plan to extend Summersalt to the starting point of swimming apparel and enter a series of travel suits. Coul points out that the company’s typical consumer is a young millennial shopper, and travelwear is a natural expansion of the brand, which attempts to attract travel and experience-oriented people as they allocate their spending.

“This is a unique period for the retail industry; women like to experience the experience,” Kurt said. “We really think this is the next frontier of the retail industry. We want to position Summersalt as the next generation brand that focuses on travel.”

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